Uluru: a reminder of our world’s transformation

Last year, I travelled to the centre of the Australian desert and took this photo of iconic Uluru. Not that you are able to tell this was taken 12 months ago: it could’ve been last week, or even the year I was born. The reason I point this out is because this rock is a very physical and literal symbol of stability, and the unchanging habit of monolithic natural features. And this stark reminder of unyielding durability juxtaposes with the examples of transformation that flow around it everyday.

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Experimenting with disposables

When I was a kid, I had several disposable cameras and would snap away unbothered by angles, lighting, positioning, and the endless list of other photographic points I often consider before taking a shot with my digital camera these days. Reminiscing over this carefree approach to taking pictures in my childhood, I decided to bring along a disposable camera with me on a camping trip with my mum, in the hope that I would freely take some photos.

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The temporary nature of glaciers

Seeing a glacier in real life is like seeing behind the scenes of the world; the pure geological strength of the planet displayed in front of you. Glaciers are the remnants of the cold carving knife that shaped the landscape millions of years ago, forging valleys and shaping mountains, and a stark reminder of the forces of our environment and the ways in which it’s changed over time.

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